Brutalist Architecture | The Torre Velasca

The spectacular skyscraper, The ‘Torre Velasca’, erected in Milan in the 1950s. Reminiscent of the old fortress palazzos, it is incred...


The spectacular skyscraper, The ‘Torre Velasca’, erected in Milan in the 1950s. Reminiscent of the old fortress palazzos, it is incredibly symbolic in Milan’s rush towards development and reconstruction from the post-war years. This monumental building has an unusually strong physical presence given by its construction which lends a purpose for conveying ambitions of its makers.


An architectural progression of its time, the edifice is 106 metres in height and from an on-lookers perspective is suggestive of a mushroom type shape. The architects and designers for the Torre Velasca included Gian Luigi Banfi, Lodovico Barbiano di Belgiojoso, Enrico Peressutti and Ernesto Nathan Rogers. These individuals are known as BBPR, an acronym for the subsequent masterminds behind the project.

A masterpiece in its own right, the tower is synonymous for the first generation of modern architecture and known as being both ‘neo-liberty’, 19th century buildings and also portraying a prosperous economic subsequent decade. Made of reinforced concrete, it’s unique style dubbed ‘Brutalist Modern’ captures the essence of medieval fortresses and castles by use of the lower parts built narrower, while the higher parts are propped up by wooden boards or stone beams. 


The tower evokes a pivotal era of change, where execution of new developments and progression were starting to be implemented. All the while still remaining in Milanese context; this is what the Torre Velasca historically accomplished. 

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